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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NOW A TNT ORIGINAL SERIES • “A first-rate tale of crime and punishment that will keep readers guessing until the final pages.”—Entertainment Weekly

“Caleb Carr’s rich period thriller takes us back to the moment in history when the modern idea of the serial killer became available to us.”—The Detroit News

When The Alienist was first published in 1994, it was a major phenomenon, spending six months on the New York Times bestseller list, receiving critical acclaim, and selling millions of copies. This modern classic continues to be a touchstone of historical suspense fiction for readers everywhere.

The year is 1896. The city is New York. Newspaper reporter John Schuyler Moore is summoned by his friend Dr. Laszlo Kreizler—a psychologist, or “alienist”—to view the horribly mutilated body of an adolescent boy abandoned on the unfinished Williamsburg Bridge. From there the two embark on a revolutionary effort in criminology: creating a psychological profile of the perpetrator based on the details of his crimes. Their dangerous quest takes them into the tortured past and twisted mind of a murderer who will kill again before their hunt is over.

Fast-paced and riveting, infused with historical detail, The Alienist conjures up Gilded Age New York, with its tenements and mansions, corrupt cops and flamboyant gangsters, shining opera houses and seamy gin mills. It is an age in which questioning society’s belief that all killers are born, not made, could have unexpected and fatal consequences.

Praise for The Alienist

“[A] delicious premise . . . Its settings and characterizations are much more sophisticated than the run-of-the-mill thrillers that line the shelves in bookstores.” The Washington Post Book World

“Mesmerizing.” Detroit Free Press

“The method of the hunt and the disparate team of hunters lift the tale beyond the level of a good thriller—way beyond. . . . A remarkable combination of historical novel and psychological thriller.” The Buffalo News

“Engrossing.” Newsweek

“Gripping, atmospheric . . . intelligent and entertaining.” USA Today

“A high-spirited, charged-up and unfailingly smart thriller.” Los Angeles Times

“Keeps readers turning pages well past their bedtime.” San Francisco Chronicle

Review

“A first-rate tale of crime and punishment that will keep readers guessing until the final pages.” Entertainment Weekly

“Caleb Carr’s rich period thriller takes us back to the moment in history when the modern idea of the serial killer became available to us . . . [and] tracks the efforts of a team of farsighted investigators working frantically to solve a string of hideous murders. . . . Absorbing . . . suspenseful . . . gratifying.” The Detroit News

“A high-spirited, charged-up and unfailingly smart thriller.” Los Angeles Times

“You can smell the fear in the air.” The New York Times

“Keeps readers turning pages well past their bedtime.” San Francisco Chronicle
 
“Engrossing.” Newsweek

“A ripsnorter of a plot . . . a fine dark ride.” The Arizona Daily Star

“[A] delicious premise . . . Its settings and characterizations are much more sophisticated than the run-of-the-mill thrillers that line the shelves in bookstores.” The Washington Post Book World

“The method of the hunt and the disparate team of hunters lift the tale beyond the level of a good thriller—way beyond. . . . A remarkable combination of historical novel and psychological thriller.” The Buffalo News

“Mesmerizing.” Detroit Free Press

“Remarkable . . . The reader is taken on a whirlwind tour of the Gilded Age metropolis, climbing up tenement stairs, scrambling across rooftops, and witnessing midnight autopsies. . . . A breathtaking, finely crafted mystery.” Richmond Times-Dispatch

“Gripping, atmospheric . . . intelligent and entertaining.” USA Today

“Harrowing, fascinating . . . will please fans of Ragtime and The Silence of the Lambs.” The Flint Journal

About the Author

Caleb Carr is the critically acclaimed author of  The Alienist, The Angel of Darkness, The Lessons of Terror, Killing Time, The Devil Soldier, The Italian Secretary, The Legend of Broken, and  Surrender, New York. He has taught military history at Bard College, and worked extensively in film, television, and the theater. His military and political writings have appeared in numerous magazines and periodicals, among them  The Washington Post, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. He lives in upstate New York.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CHAPTER 1
 
January 8th, 1919
 
 
Theodore is in the ground.
 
The words as I write them make as little sense as did the sight of his coffin descending into a patch of sandy soil near Sagamore Hill, the place he loved more than any other on earth. As I stood there this afternoon, in the cold January wind that blew off Long Island Sound, I thought to myself: Of course it’s a joke. Of course he’ll burst the lid open, blind us all with that ridiculous grin and split our ears with a high-pitched bark of laughter. Then he’ll exclaim that there’s work to do—“action to get!”—and we’ll all be martialed to the task of protecting some obscure species of newt from the ravages of a predatory industrial giant bent on planting a fetid factory on the little amphibian’s breeding ground. I was not alone in such fantasies; everyone at the funeral expected something of the kind, it was plain on their faces. All reports indicate that most of the country and much of the world feel the same way. The notion of Theodore Roosevelt being gone is that—unacceptable.
 
In truth, he’d been fading for longer than anyone wanted to admit, really since his son Quentin was killed in the last days of the Great Butchery. Cecil Spring-Rice once droned, in his best British blend of affection and needling, that Roosevelt was throughout his life “about six”; and Herm Hagedorn noted that after Quentin was shot out of the sky in the summer of 1918 “the boy in Theodore died.” I dined with Laszlo Kreizler at Delmonico’s tonight, and mentioned Hagedorn’s comment to him. For the remaining two courses of my meal I was treated to a long, typically passionate explanation of why Quentin’s death was more than simply heartbreaking for Theodore: he had felt profound guilt, too, guilt at having so instilled his philosophy of “the strenuous life” in all his children that they often placed themselves deliberately in harm’s way, knowing it would delight their beloved father. Grief was almost unbearable to Theodore, I’d always known that; whenever he had to come to grips with the death of someone close, it seemed he might not survive the struggle. But it wasn’t until tonight, while listening to Kreizler, that I understood the extent to which moral uncertainty was also intolerable to the twenty-sixth president, who sometimes seemed to think himself Justice personified.
 
Kreizler…He didn’t want to attend the funeral, though Edith Roosevelt would have liked him to. She has always been truly partial to the man she calls “the enigma,” the brilliant doctor whose studies of the human mind have disturbed so many people so profoundly over the last forty years. Kreizler wrote Edith a note explaining that he did not much like the idea of a world without Theodore, and, being as he’s now sixty-four and has spent his life staring ugly realities full in the face, he thinks he’ll just indulge himself and ignore the fact of his friend’s passing. Edith told me today that reading Kreizler’s note moved her to tears, because she realized that Theodore’s boundless affection and enthusiasm—which revolted so many cynics and was, I’m obliged to say in the interests of journalistic integrity, sometimes difficult even for friends to tolerate—had been strong enough to touch a man whose remove from most of human society seemed to almost everyone else unbridgeable.
 
Some of the boys from the Times wanted me to come to a memorial dinner tonight, but a quiet evening with Kreizler seemed much the more appropriate thing. It wasn’t out of nostalgia for any shared boyhood in New York that we raised our glasses, because Laszlo and Theodore didn’t actually meet until Harvard. No, Kreizler and I were fixing our hearts on the spring of 1896—nearly a quarter-century ago!—and on a series of events that still seems too bizarre to have occurred even in this city. By the end of our dessert and Madeira (and how poignant to have a memorial meal in Delmonico’s, good old Del’s, now on its way out like the rest of us, but in those days the bustling scene of some of our most important encounters), the two of us were laughing and shaking our heads, amazed to this day that we were able to get through the ordeal with our skins; and still saddened, as I could see in Kreizler’s face and feel in my own chest, by the thought of those who didn’t.
 
There’s no simple way to describe it. I could say that in retrospect it seems that all three of our lives, and those of many others, led inevitably and fatefully to that one experience; but then I’d be broaching the subject of psychological determinism and questioning man’s free will—reopening, in other words, the philosophical conundrum that wove irrepressibly in and out of the nightmarish proceedings, like the only hummable tune in a difficult opera. Or I could say that, during the course of those months, Roosevelt, Kreizler, and I, assisted by some of the best people I’ve ever known, set out on the trail of a murderous monster and ended up coming face-to-face with a frightened child; but that would be deliberately vague, too full of the “ambiguity” that seems to fascinate current novelists and which has kept me, lately, out of the bookstores and in the picture houses. No, there’s only one way to do it, and that’s to tell the whole thing, going back to that first grisly night and that first butchered body; back even further, in fact, to our days with Professor James at Harvard. Yes, to dredge it all up and put it finally before the public—that’s the way.
 
The public may not like it; in fact, it’s been concern about public reaction that’s forced us to keep our secret for so many years. Even the majority of Theodore’s obituaries made no reference to the event. In listing his achievements as president of the Board of Commissioners of New York City’s Police Department from 1895 to 1897, only the Herald—which goes virtually unread these days—tacked on uncomfortably, “and of course, the solution to the ghastly murders of 1896, which so appalled the city.” Yet Theodore never claimed credit for that solution. True, he had been open-minded enough, despite his own qualms, to put the investigation in the hands of a man who could solve the puzzle. But privately he always acknowledged that man to be Kreizler.
 
He could scarcely have done so publicly. Theodore knew that the American people were not ready to believe him, or even to hear the details of the assertion. I wonder if they are now. Kreizler doubts it. I told him I intended to write the story, and he gave me one of his sardonic chuckles and said that it would only frighten and repel people, nothing more. The country, he declared tonight, really hasn’t changed much since 1896, for all the work of people like Theodore, and Jake Riis and Lincoln Steffens, and the many other men and women of their ilk. We’re all still running, according to Kreizler—in our private moments we Americans are running just as fast and fearfully as we were then, running away from the darkness we know to lie behind so many apparently tranquil household doors, away from the nightmares that continue to be injected into children’s skulls by people whom Nature tells them they should love and trust, running ever faster and in ever greater numbers toward those potions, powders, priests, and philosophies that promise to obliterate such fears and nightmares, and ask in return only slavish devotion. Can he truly be right…?
 
But I wax ambiguous. To the beginning, then!
 

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
3,234 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just as great a read yrs later...
Reviewed in the United States on February 10, 2018
I bought the ebook version to re-read before the release of the new TNT series - I had loved the book when I 1st read it in the 90s, and wanted a quick refresher course. That proved to be a great decision, the book is even better than I had remembered. What always... See more
I bought the ebook version to re-read before the release of the new TNT series - I had loved the book when I 1st read it in the 90s, and wanted a quick refresher course. That proved to be a great decision, the book is even better than I had remembered.
What always impressed me wt this book was the seamless merging of historical fact with pure fiction. I, like the author Caleb Carr, have been a fan of Theodore Roosevelt''s and to find him walking throughout the pages of this book has been wonderful. I loved the of 1896 New York, almost a living, breathing character in its own right, especially wt so many references to known landmarks.
The characters are well-drawn, the plot moves along well. The end surprised me... again, but for different reasons this time.
I recommend this book to all who love a good crime story and appreciate history. I can only hope that the series will do it justice, although my reaction to Sara''s character.....hmmmmm.
75 people found this helpful
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C. M Mills
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Alienist has been reissured in this tv series tie-editon of Caleb Carr''s great fictional tale of serial murder in New York
Reviewed in the United States on January 20, 2018
The Alienist refers to Dr. Lazlo Kreisler. An alienist the nineteenth century referred to experts who studied varying mental pathologies. A killer is loose in the dark, fetid and dank streets of New York City. The year is 1896. Kreisler puts together a team to help track... See more
The Alienist refers to Dr. Lazlo Kreisler. An alienist the nineteenth century referred to experts who studied varying mental pathologies. A killer is loose in the dark, fetid and dank streets of New York City. The year is 1896. Kreisler puts together a team to help track down a serial killer whose specialty the gruesome murder of young boys who spend their miserable lives as male prostitutes. The team includes Harvard educated New York Times reporter John Schuyler Moore. Moore is joined with Sara Howard a weapon wielding feminist who aspires to be a female police officer in the male dominated corrupt police department of the city. Young Theodore Roosevelt is the crusading police commissioner who is out to stamp out crime and corruption in the big city.
Carr is good at including historical details in this intricate work. We learn all about the Metropolitan Opera, Natural Museum of Natural History, the various bridges and boroughs of the teeming city of immigrants are drawn with pastel colors illuminating the gilded age of gas and gory murder. It was during this era that Jack the Ripper in London and other serial killers first became known to the public.
The lengthy work is well written and suspenseful. Those looking for explicit sex scenes should look elsewhere; this is a sober work whose chief focus is on the solving of the horrendous crimes. There are many surprises and exciting moments on our ride to justice. The book has been turned into a new miniseries on TNT network which will draw new fans to the honey of this outstanding work. I first read the book in 1994 when it appeared to acclaim by critics and public alike. I enjoyed rereading the novel gaining new insights and appreciation of all the research Carr lent to this fine work. It is destined to become a classic in the historical crime genre. Recommended.
36 people found this helpful
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Sandi Rocks
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Good, but gruesome
Reviewed in the United States on January 29, 2018
Good, but gruesome, read. Fairly fast, intricate plot, believable. NOTE; children put through gruesome situations. But the writer kept me wanting to return to resolve the questions posed. Will now watch the TV show of the same and see how closely it follows.
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Katie Fetterly
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great historical fiction novel!
Reviewed in the United States on November 18, 2017
While this was required reading for composition at my college, it was a fun book to read. This is not a book for the faint of heart or those who do not tolerate violence against children or sexual deviance, even in the non-fiction realm. It has graphic aspects. Carr gives a... See more
While this was required reading for composition at my college, it was a fun book to read. This is not a book for the faint of heart or those who do not tolerate violence against children or sexual deviance, even in the non-fiction realm. It has graphic aspects. Carr gives a wonderful account of late 19th century New York City and thrills with interesting commentary about the city at that time, and develops a solid story with a friendship woven into a tense investigation. I am looking forward to reading this book again!
28 people found this helpful
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Colonel DTop Contributor: Star Wars
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Taught thriller set in old New York worth a read
Reviewed in the United States on January 5, 2018
I read the 1994 novel “The Alienist” by Caleb Carr when it was first published and enjoyed it quite a lot. Seeing a recent announcement that TNT is releasing a miniseries based on the book provided the stimulus for me to revisit Carr’s thriller. An ‘alienist’... See more
I read the 1994 novel “The Alienist” by Caleb Carr when it was first published and enjoyed it quite a lot. Seeing a recent announcement that TNT is releasing a miniseries based on the book provided the stimulus for me to revisit Carr’s thriller.

An ‘alienist’ is an antiquated term for a psychiatrist which at the turn of the last century was a profession not held in high esteem. The setting is New York City and a string of grisly murders of young male prostitutes has the cities new Police Commissioner, Theodore Roosevelt, desperate for a solution. An old Harvard chum, ‘alienist’ Dr. Laszlo Kreisler is enlisted in the hunt as a pioneering profiler. Kreisler is aided by another Harvard classmate, crime reporter John Schuyler More, police secretary Sara Howard, and a pair of sibling detectives the Isaacsons, street urchin Stevie Taggart and Cyrus who is Kreisler’s driver.

Carr does a good job of painting a picture of old New York and captures the period nicely. He keeps the pages turning as our team begins to unravel the identity of the depraved serial killer. The suspense builds right to the end and an exciting confrontation between Kreisler and Moore with the killer. The plot develops methodically and for some readers perhaps too slowly. Development of secondary characters is a bit lacking. I felt we didn’t really get to know Sara, Stevie, and the brothers with as much depth as there could have been.

All told “The Alienist” holds up well some 23 years later and I enjoyed reading it again, enough to order the sequel “Angel of Darkness” for my Kindle. What’s surprising is that Carr quit the series after two books, you get the feeling that these characters could have gone on with more stories to tell. Here’s hoping the miniseries is as good.
12 people found this helpful
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GirlMom2
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
So much history mixed with this mystery
Reviewed in the United States on June 25, 2020
After watching the television series, I really wanted to read this book to see how the two may differ. I normally read the book first, but in this case, I''m glad I watched the show because I think it might''ve been a little difficult to follow the book completely without... See more
After watching the television series, I really wanted to read this book to see how the two may differ. I normally read the book first, but in this case, I''m glad I watched the show because I think it might''ve been a little difficult to follow the book completely without having seen it.
The amount of research that went into this book is impressive. Carr is clearly a historian first, though his writing is also topnotch. There were times I felt as if I was reading a classic novel because of the language that was used, which I appreciate, but someone who reads action adventure or mystery written at a quicker pace might be put-off by some of the word choices.
This is not a fast-pace thriller. It is a methodically unwinding mystery that does more to explore the why of the murders than the who, though both are dissected thoroughly. The characters are all well-developed, particularly the three main investigators and the antagonist.
As a reader who is interested in New York history, I loved the aspect of this book that let us see what life was like in this particular time in one of the world''s most fascinating cities.
I recommend this book to anyone who loves history, mystery, and New York City. If you can''t handle gruesome descriptions of violent acts against children, though, this is not the book for you.
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Terry Nelson
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Get “Alienated”
Reviewed in the United States on November 24, 2017
If you’re entertained by the variations of Sherlock Holmes, Miss Marple, Hercules Poirot and tv shows like CSI and Criminal Minds then this is right up your alley. This book takes you back to the early days of the science of criminology and forensic science with original... See more
If you’re entertained by the variations of Sherlock Holmes, Miss Marple, Hercules Poirot and tv shows like CSI and Criminal Minds then this is right up your alley. This book takes you back to the early days of the science of criminology and forensic science with original characters that are true to the historical setting. There is lots of historical background interwoven into the story that makes it more fascinating but also adds so much detail that it gets a little bogged down at times and slows the momentum of the story. Still there is enough suspense and mystery to keep you turning pages to the very end.
10 people found this helpful
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Bruce Stern
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mystery-Thriller Classic
Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2015
Mysteries, and its frequent brethren, thrillers, can be good stories; but they are rarely—less rare than those called "literary fiction"—to be considered classics, or at least a classic of a genre, or sub-genre. The Alienist I consider to be a mystery-thriller... See more
Mysteries, and its frequent brethren, thrillers, can be good stories; but they are rarely—less rare than those called "literary fiction"—to be considered classics, or at least a classic of a genre, or sub-genre. The Alienist I consider to be a mystery-thriller classic.
The author, Caleb Carr, goes beyond the paint-by-the-numbers form of traditional mystery form. There is lots of science, a good deal of it newly hatched, therefore disbelieved, contentiousness, yet generating awe. Forensics, aberrant psychology, particularly the aberrant forms, methodical investigative policing, objectivity, rather than prejudice, superstition, and questionable conjecture, are all parts of this story that takes place in that, for most, dark, dank, and dirty world of 1896 New York City.
Mr. Carr has done an incredible job of incorporating historical figures—Theodore Roosevelt, then the city''s police commissioner; J.P. Morgan, the most powerful financier in America; and others. They mesh seamlessly with the fictional investigative team investigating the gruesome adolescent murders gripping the city, and striving and struggling to find the murderer.
And, how well the author created a three-dimensional evil, psychologically crippled and devilish protagonist. So much so that feeling sympathy for him despite his hideous work feels not strange or wrong.
So full is the book with detail, nuance, exceptional characters, and a fiendishly grand story—a classic that''s a superlative example of how good mystery-thriller fiction can be—that I cannot avoid giving it 5 stars.
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Top reviews from other countries

Alana_thebooknerd
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No witnesses. No evidence. No suspects. And the killer is only getting bolder
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 23, 2020
The review I really loved this book, I found it refreshing and different from anything else I’d read in the last couple of years. There isn''t usually such a strong focus on psychology and the mind in stories like this but ultimately it was psychology and other types of...See more
The review I really loved this book, I found it refreshing and different from anything else I’d read in the last couple of years. There isn''t usually such a strong focus on psychology and the mind in stories like this but ultimately it was psychology and other types of criminal science that are the true hero of this book. I only found out this book existed after stumbling across the Netflix series and seeing it was linked to a book, usually I’ve read the book and then notice any TV and Film adaptations. I was thrown into the setting of this book, 1896 New York, life is not a simple, rife with racism, poverty and corruption (especially in the Police Force) New York is not a safe place to be. This is bought to life in the writing, I loved the historical facts and references made on this great city throughout the book. Transporting us straight into the streets, during journey’s in cabs the author directs us street by street point out monuments and important features of the New York culture at the time. The same hustle and bustle of the New York we know now but in an earlier time. We find out about the segregation within the city as the immigrant population increases and more cultures arrive. Throughout the book you understand the socio-economic status of New York. The Plot of this book is complex and full of mystery, for every question we get an answer to even more question arise. The whole story was tense and I really enjoyed the sense of discovery that the characters had with each step closer they got to identifying the murder. Not only was there the mystery of the murders but also the cloak and dagger behaviour of our band of crime fighters to keep the investigation away from the corrupt police department. I loved how accurately the mistrust and disgust of psychology criminal profiling and forensic was portrayed and created the basis for this story, portraying how other mavericks of science may have paved the way for newer, more modern detective processes. Having such a strong sense of setting really helped the flow of this plot. The thing I enjoyed the most was simply how anonymous the killer was throughout a large chunk of the book allowing for the focus to be on the investigation. We literally go from knowing nothing about them to slowly building a picture and we as the reader are taken through each step, seeing the early forensic techniques like handwriting analysis and fingerprint analysis being bought to life with a small bit of background on where these stemmed from is just so interesting. This will really suit some readers, people like me who really enjoy the how’s. If you aren’t driven by detail and/or interested in the scientific detail this book likely won’t be for you, the author hasn’t dumbed the process. I was drawn to Dr Laszlo Kreizler (our MC), his single mindedness, determination and belief in his craft is inspiring. He’s presented as almost unlikeable due to his peculiar nature and high intellect. He is the driving force of his team and selecting what is arguably his best friend, crime reporter, John Moore who due to the nature of his job can easily get into crime scenes and find out information. Sarah, the Secretary to the Police Commission who uses her position to locate information from Police sources and the Isaacson brothers, two Jewish Detectives who are shunned not only for their religious beliefs but their forward thinking ideas on detective work. Moore was probably the character out of the whole group that I struggled at times to get on with, sometimes finding him frustrating or a little to moany. I loved that the author put a pioneering female character into this book. Sarah is fierce and dreams of being a detective, she is the first of two women to be hired by the Police and sees the work Kreizler and the others are doing as a way to show a woman is more than capable. Summary This book is dark, with danger and a hella lot of mystery. It has a lot to offer people interested in Historical Mystery Fiction, however, I’ll be the first to admit the way this book is written can be hard going, if you don’t have a keen interest in psychology, criminal psychology and/or historical mysteries this could be a hard read for you. The action is also spread out with a lot of effort going into taking you through the investigation. The murders are also excessively gruesome and gory, so you need to be prepared to read for awful things, if you can’t cope with children under 15 being murdered this isn’t the book for you. For me the writing style although tough at times added to the authenticity and I ended this book feeling like I’d been with the characters every step of the way. My degree is in Psychology too which is another reason I enjoyed this book so much because I knew the theory they were talking about. Overall, this book just fit me as a person and I’d recommend you try it.
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Bookboodle
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Dark and gruesome
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 2, 2018
Here''s another book that I bought on a 99p Kindle deal and really had my money''s worth! Although the beginning is very heavy on the psycho babble, which did put me off somewhat, this is like the mother of all psychological thrillers!  It''s very dark and disturbing and...See more
Here''s another book that I bought on a 99p Kindle deal and really had my money''s worth! Although the beginning is very heavy on the psycho babble, which did put me off somewhat, this is like the mother of all psychological thrillers!  It''s very dark and disturbing and certainly not for the faint-hearted as they''re graphic images of child murders which will not be to everyone''s taste.  Once I got past all the psychiatry stuff it''s a gripping and race against time murder mystery! I loved the setting, the period in which it was set and Sara''s character and her dogged determination to the first woman working in the New York police department. If you need any more convincing to read (or watch) this, a modern day equivalent would be The Mentalist but soooo much darker! Since reading the book I have watched the Netflix adaptation which is very good too and apart from the ending stays very true to the book, loved the cast selection!
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David Cranson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A fabulous story. Best book I''ve read of the year so far.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 26, 2018
Brilliant characterisation, Wonderful story-telling, nicely paced. Great background, to the extend where you can visualise and hear and smell what is being described. A horrible world of child prostitution, evil, poverty, crime, corruption . . . and a small group of people...See more
Brilliant characterisation, Wonderful story-telling, nicely paced. Great background, to the extend where you can visualise and hear and smell what is being described. A horrible world of child prostitution, evil, poverty, crime, corruption . . . and a small group of people trying to do the right thing. Being shocked, saddened, repulsed and emboldened all at the same time. A sad indictment of a time and place that was open for all to see, and that still lives, but now in the shadows. Changing times, new ideas, progress - in the face of those wanting the status quo. A real page turner, making me want to pick it up again after I''ve eaten or done some work, or put it down for any reason. Picking this book up is a must. Finishing it is a must. Absorbing it, living it, feeling it. So much better than the TV series. Too many changes from book to screen. The book lives and breathes and pulls you in.
2 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Pacy Victorian yarn
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 10, 2019
There is nothing to dislike in this psychological crime thriller of an early forensic psychologist and his trusty team chasing down a child serial killer in the corruption of New York. Historical characters are woven into the narrative with skill and inhabit the...See more
There is nothing to dislike in this psychological crime thriller of an early forensic psychologist and his trusty team chasing down a child serial killer in the corruption of New York. Historical characters are woven into the narrative with skill and inhabit the investigation without jarring the flow. I read the book in tandem with watching the Netflix series, the book is definitely better.
2 people found this helpful
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Aaron Sparks
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An excellent period mystery.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 5, 2019
Loved this book for the ties to historical characters, the unique first person telling from Moore’s perspective like a Watson to Sherlock (Kreisler). Although I just related it to Sherlock Holmes, it is a stand-alone book with interesting characters of varying personalities...See more
Loved this book for the ties to historical characters, the unique first person telling from Moore’s perspective like a Watson to Sherlock (Kreisler). Although I just related it to Sherlock Holmes, it is a stand-alone book with interesting characters of varying personalities and a few comedic moments. Even the female character seems to be an advanced feminism, less of the helpless dame, and more of a formidable female. Excellent enjoyable story, having seen the show and wanted to see how it played out in the original author’s depiction.
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